Poetry Spotlight: Michele Battiste

Michele Battiste’s Waiting for the Wreck to Burn explores themes of murder, ruin, and redemption. The narrator navigates two towns—one called Ruination, one unnamed—split by a river that threatens to flood. Poems border the land between life and death and, though haunting, invite the reader on a journey to a new start. In addition to Waiting for the Wreck to…

Poetry Spotlight: Jeanne Larsen

What Penelope Chooses is a feminist retelling that gives Homer’s Odyssey a modern setting while still retaining the core mythos. In this journey through language jam-packed with allusion, Jeanne Larsen creates a genealogy of women in the Odyssey and their subversive forces. We hear their laments as they try to make their own choices in a world defined by men and a war…

Poetry Spotlight: Contributor Angela Ball

Angela Ball’s poems and translations have appeared in The New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, Colorado Review, Denver Quarterly, Field, Partisan Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, The Southern Review, and elsewhere. She has published six books of poetry including Quartet (Carnegie Mellon, 1995), the Night Clerk At the Hotel of Both Worlds (Pittsburgh UP, 2007), and, most recently, Talking Pillow (Pittsburgh UP, 2017). The Director of the Center for Writers at the University…

Contributor Spotlight Bonanza

Welcome to our new seasonal Contributor Spotlight Bonanza! After fourteen years of publishing poetry, our contributor list continues to grow, encompassing poets at all stages of their publishing careers. This is the first of what will be a regular seasonal round-up of new collections by previous Memorious contributors. I asked each of these fifteen poets…

Poetry Spotlight: Contributor Jill McDonough

Memorious contributor Jill McDonough’s latest poetry collection, Reaper, takes war poetry to new places: computer screens far removed from the action. With elegant, conversational free verse and surprising, deft villanelles, McDonough ruminates on drone warfare, one of America’s more controversial war tactics. In chatty meditations on drones’ names, McDonough reveals what their makers might have…

Poetry Spotlight: Contributor Lloyd Schwartz

Acclaimed poet Lloyd Schwartz’s long-awaited fourth full collection of poems, Little Kisses, has recently been released by the University of Chicago Press. From the opening title poem, he again proves himself to be, as the New York Times has praised him, “the master of the poetic one-liner.” The journey of Little Kisses is a constant…

Poetry Spotlight: Contributor Derrick Harriell

Derrick Harriell’s third collection of poetry, Stripper in Wonderland, dances. Recently released from LSU Press, Harriell’s collection explores music, religion, and racism while continuously twirling readers through past, present, and future spaces. Influenced by Funk and Funk culture, his poems grip us with their musicality, an undercurrent that keeps us hungry for the next moment,…

Poetry Spotlight: Contributor Michael Bazzett

Within the poems of Michael Bazzett’s new collection, Our Lands Are Not So Different (Horsethief), you may find yourself in conversation with a man who “specialized in enslaving the wind” or watching a bison leap a fence. You might observe a woman slipping into another woman’s life—“an older version of herself”—as she tries on a…

Poetry Spotlight: Contributor Leslie Harrison

Leslie Harrison’s second poetry collection, The Book of Endings, part of the Akron Series in Poetry, takes place in a space between the real world (where it’s usually winter), the imagination, language, art, and myth. The poems seem always to be trying to get to the bottom of things, and one of the pleasures of…

Poetry Spotlight: Contributor Jacques J. Rancourt

Jacques J. Rancourt is an Issue 26 contributor and winner of the Pleiades Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry. His debut collection, Novena, is a coming-of-age and a coming out. Wresting a fractured identity from the past and making of it a gift for the beloved—and for the reader—Novena seeks redemption, wholeness. Strapped to the “[c]lutched mast” of his ship, Rancourt’s Odysseus…